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File: raspberry/boot-part/multiotp-tree/etc/freeradius/modules/inner-tunnel

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File: raspberry/boot-part/multiotp-tree/etc/freeradius/modules/inner-tunnel
Role: Auxiliary data
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Description: Auxiliary data
Class: multiOTP PHP class
Authenticate and manage OTP strong user tokens
Author: By
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Date: 4 months ago
Size: 12,594 bytes
 

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# -*- text -*-
######################################################################
#
#	This is a virtual server that handles *only* inner tunnel
#	requests for EAP-TTLS and PEAP types.
#
#	$Id$
#
######################################################################

server inner-tunnel {

#
#  This next section is here to allow testing of the "inner-tunnel"
#  authentication methods, independently from the "default" server.
#  It is listening on "localhost", so that it can only be used from
#  the same machine.
#
#	$ radtest USER PASSWORD 127.0.0.1:18120 0 testing123
#
#  If it works, you have configured the inner tunnel correctly.  To check
#  if PEAP will work, use:
#
#	$ radtest -t mschap USER PASSWORD 127.0.0.1:18120 0 testing123
#
#  If that works, PEAP should work.  If that command doesn't work, then
#
#	FIX THE INNER TUNNEL CONFIGURATION UNTIL IT WORKS.
#
#  Do NOT keep testing PEAP.  It won't help.
#
listen {
       ipaddr = 127.0.0.1
       port = 18120
       type = auth
}


#  Authorization. First preprocess (hints and huntgroups files),
#  then realms, and finally look in the "users" file.
#
#  The order of the realm modules will determine the order that
#  we try to find a matching realm.
#
#  Make *sure* that 'preprocess' comes before any realm if you 
#  need to setup hints for the remote radius server
authorize {
	#
	#  The chap module will set 'Auth-Type := CHAP' if we are
	#  handling a CHAP request and Auth-Type has not already been set
	#chap is now handled by multiOTP

	#
	#  If the users are logging in with an MS-CHAP-Challenge
	#  attribute for authentication, the mschap module will find
	#  the MS-CHAP-Challenge attribute, and add 'Auth-Type := MS-CHAP'
	#  to the request, which will cause the server to then use
	#  the mschap module for authentication.
	#mschap is now handled by multiOTP

	#
	#  Pull crypt'd passwords from /etc/passwd or /etc/shadow,
	#  using the system API's to get the password.  If you want
	#  to read /etc/passwd or /etc/shadow directly, see the
	#  passwd module, above.
	#
#	unix

	#
	#  Look for IPASS style 'realm/', and if not found, look for
	#  '@realm', and decide whether or not to proxy, based on
	#  that.
#	IPASS

	#
	#  If you are using multiple kinds of realms, you probably
	#  want to set "ignore_null = yes" for all of them.
	#  Otherwise, when the first style of realm doesn't match,
	#  the other styles won't be checked.
	#
	#  Note that proxying the inner tunnel authentication means
	#  that the user MAY use one identity in the outer session
	#  (e.g. "anonymous", and a different one here
	#  (e.g. "user@example.com").  The inner session will then be
	#  proxied elsewhere for authentication.  If you are not
	#  careful, this means that the user can cause you to forward
	#  the authentication to another RADIUS server, and have the
	#  accounting logs *not* sent to the other server.  This makes
	#  it difficult to bill people for their network activity.
	#
	suffix
#	ntdomain

	#
	#  The "suffix" module takes care of stripping the domain
	#  (e.g. "@example.com") from the User-Name attribute, and the
	#  next few lines ensure that the request is not proxied.
	#
	#  If you want the inner tunnel request to be proxied, delete
	#  the next few lines.
	#
	update control {
	       Proxy-To-Realm := LOCAL
	}

	#
	#  This module takes care of EAP-MSCHAPv2 authentication.
	#
	#  It also sets the EAP-Type attribute in the request
	#  attribute list to the EAP type from the packet.
	#
	#  The example below uses module failover to avoid querying all
	#  of the following modules if the EAP module returns "ok".
	#  Therefore, your LDAP and/or SQL servers will not be queried
	#  for the many packets that go back and forth to set up TTLS
	#  or PEAP.  The load on those servers will therefore be reduced.
	#
	eap {
		ok = return
	}

	#
	#  Read the 'users' file
	files

	#
	#  Look in an SQL database.  The schema of the database
	#  is meant to mirror the "users" file.
	#
	#  See "Authorization Queries" in sql.conf
#	sql

	#
	#  If you are using /etc/smbpasswd, and are also doing
	#  mschap authentication, the un-comment this line, and
	#  configure the 'etc_smbpasswd' module, above.
#	etc_smbpasswd

	#
	#  The ldap module will set Auth-Type to LDAP if it has not
	#  already been set
#	ldap

	#
	#  Enforce daily limits on time spent logged in.
#	daily

	#
	# Use the checkval module
#	checkval

	expiration
	logintime

	#  
	# Handle multiOTP (http://www.multiotp.com/) authentication.  
	# This must be add BEFORE the first "pap" entry found in the file.  
	multiotp

	#
	#  If no other module has claimed responsibility for
	#  authentication, then try to use PAP.  This allows the
	#  other modules listed above to add a "known good" password
	#  to the request, and to do nothing else.  The PAP module
	#  will then see that password, and use it to do PAP
	#  authentication.
	#
	#  This module should be listed last, so that the other modules
	#  get a chance to set Auth-Type for themselves.
	#
	pap
}


#  Authentication.
#
#
#  This section lists which modules are available for authentication.
#  Note that it does NOT mean 'try each module in order'.  It means
#  that a module from the 'authorize' section adds a configuration
#  attribute 'Auth-Type := FOO'.  That authentication type is then
#  used to pick the apropriate module from the list below.
#

#  In general, you SHOULD NOT set the Auth-Type attribute.  The server
#  will figure it out on its own, and will do the right thing.  The
#  most common side effect of erroneously setting the Auth-Type
#  attribute is that one authentication method will work, but the
#  others will not.
#
#  The common reasons to set the Auth-Type attribute by hand
#  is to either forcibly reject the user, or forcibly accept him.
#
authenticate {
	#  
	# Handle multiOTP (http://www.multiotp.com/) authentication.  
	# This must be add BEFORE the first "Auth-Type PAP" entry found in the file.  
	Auth-Type multiotp {
		multiotp  
	}  

	#
	#  PAP authentication, when a back-end database listed
	#  in the 'authorize' section supplies a password.  The
	#  password can be clear-text, or encrypted.
	Auth-Type PAP {
		pap
	}

	#
	#  Most people want CHAP authentication
	#  A back-end database listed in the 'authorize' section
	#  MUST supply a CLEAR TEXT password.  Encrypted passwords
	#  won't work.
	Auth-Type CHAP {
		chap
	}

	#
	#  MSCHAP authentication.
	Auth-Type MS-CHAP {
		mschap
	}

	#
	#  Pluggable Authentication Modules.
#	pam

	#
	#  See 'man getpwent' for information on how the 'unix'
	#  module checks the users password.  Note that packets
	#  containing CHAP-Password attributes CANNOT be authenticated
	#  against /etc/passwd!  See the FAQ for details.
	#  
	unix

	# Uncomment it if you want to use ldap for authentication
	#
	# Note that this means "check plain-text password against
	# the ldap database", which means that EAP won't work,
	# as it does not supply a plain-text password.
#	Auth-Type LDAP {
#		ldap
#	}

	#
	#  Allow EAP authentication.
	eap
}

######################################################################
#
#	There are no accounting requests inside of EAP-TTLS or PEAP
#	tunnels.
#
######################################################################


#  Session database, used for checking Simultaneous-Use. Either the radutmp 
#  or rlm_sql module can handle this.
#  The rlm_sql module is *much* faster
session {
	radutmp

	#
	#  See "Simultaneous Use Checking Queries" in sql.conf
#	sql
}


#  Post-Authentication
#  Once we KNOW that the user has been authenticated, there are
#  additional steps we can take.
post-auth {
	# Note that we do NOT assign IP addresses here.
	# If you try to assign IP addresses for EAP authentication types,
	# it WILL NOT WORK.  You MUST use DHCP.

	#
	#  If you want to have a log of authentication replies,
	#  un-comment the following line, and the 'detail reply_log'
	#  section, above.
#	reply_log

	#
	#  After authenticating the user, do another SQL query.
	#
	#  See "Authentication Logging Queries" in sql.conf
#	sql

	#
	#  Instead of sending the query to the SQL server,
	#  write it into a log file.
	#
#	sql_log

	#
	#  Un-comment the following if you have set
	#  'edir_account_policy_check = yes' in the ldap module sub-section of
	#  the 'modules' section.
	#
#	ldap

	#
	#  Access-Reject packets are sent through the REJECT sub-section of the
	#  post-auth section.
	#
	#  Add the ldap module name (or instance) if you have set 
	#  'edir_account_policy_check = yes' in the ldap module configuration
	#
	Post-Auth-Type REJECT {
		# log failed authentications in SQL, too.
#		sql
		attr_filter.access_reject
	}

	#
	#  The example policy below updates the outer tunnel reply
	#  (usually Access-Accept) with the User-Name from the inner
	#  tunnel User-Name.  Since this section is processed in the
	#  context of the inner tunnel, "request" here means "inner
	#  tunnel request", and "outer.reply" means "outer tunnel
	#  reply attributes".
	#
	#  This example is most useful when the outer session contains
	#  a User-Name of "anonymous@....", or a MAC address.  If it
	#  is enabled, the NAS SHOULD use the inner tunnel User-Name
	#  in subsequent accounting packets.  This makes it easier to
	#  track user sessions, as they will all be based on the real
	#  name, and not on "anonymous".
	#
	#  The problem with doing this is that it ALSO exposes the
	#  real user name to any intermediate proxies.  People use
	#  "anonymous" identifiers outside of the tunnel for a very
	#  good reason: it gives them more privacy.  Setting the reply
	#  to contain the real user name removes ALL privacy from
	#  their session.
	#
	#  If you want privacy to remain, see the
	#  Chargeable-User-Identity attribute from RFC 4372.  In order
	#  to use that attribute, you will have to allocate a
	#  per-session identifier for the user, and store it in a
	#  long-term database (e.g. SQL).  You should also use that
	#  attribute INSTEAD of the configuration below.
	#
	#update outer.reply {
	#	User-Name = "%{request:User-Name}"
	#}

}

#
#  When the server decides to proxy a request to a home server,
#  the proxied request is first passed through the pre-proxy
#  stage.  This stage can re-write the request, or decide to
#  cancel the proxy.
#
#  Only a few modules currently have this method.
#
pre-proxy {
#	attr_rewrite

	#  Uncomment the following line if you want to change attributes
	#  as defined in the preproxy_users file.
#	files

	#  Uncomment the following line if you want to filter requests
	#  sent to remote servers based on the rules defined in the
	#  'attrs.pre-proxy' file.
#	attr_filter.pre-proxy

	#  If you want to have a log of packets proxied to a home
	#  server, un-comment the following line, and the
	#  'detail pre_proxy_log' section, above.
#	pre_proxy_log
}

#
#  When the server receives a reply to a request it proxied
#  to a home server, the request may be massaged here, in the
#  post-proxy stage.
#
post-proxy {

	#  If you want to have a log of replies from a home server,
	#  un-comment the following line, and the 'detail post_proxy_log'
	#  section, above.
#	post_proxy_log

#	attr_rewrite

	#  Uncomment the following line if you want to filter replies from
	#  remote proxies based on the rules defined in the 'attrs' file.
#	attr_filter.post-proxy

	#
	#  If you are proxying LEAP, you MUST configure the EAP
	#  module, and you MUST list it here, in the post-proxy
	#  stage.
	#
	#  You MUST also use the 'nostrip' option in the 'realm'
	#  configuration.  Otherwise, the User-Name attribute
	#  in the proxied request will not match the user name
	#  hidden inside of the EAP packet, and the end server will
	#  reject the EAP request.
	#
	eap

	#
	#  If the server tries to proxy a request and fails, then the
	#  request is processed through the modules in this section.
	#
	#  The main use of this section is to permit robust proxying
	#  of accounting packets.  The server can be configured to
	#  proxy accounting packets as part of normal processing.
	#  Then, if the home server goes down, accounting packets can
	#  be logged to a local "detail" file, for processing with
	#  radrelay.  When the home server comes back up, radrelay
	#  will read the detail file, and send the packets to the
	#  home server.
	#
	#  With this configuration, the server always responds to
	#  Accounting-Requests from the NAS, but only writes
	#  accounting packets to disk if the home server is down.
	#
#	Post-Proxy-Type Fail {
#			detail
#	}

}

} # inner-tunnel server block
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